June 7 in Yankee History

  • Most fans will smile in respect, I assume, to the rare long outing former ace CC Sabathia had in an 8-0 whitewashing of the visiting Red Sox on June 7, 2017, as he threw 92 pitches over eight scintillating innings, but they’ll have a lot more trouble coming to grips with the offensive star of the night, as Chris Carter delivered four runs with a three-run bomb and an rbi base hit. A Jackie Bradley, Jr. grab of Carter’s deep drive to center may have denied him a second homer, but the Yanks chose not to request replay. This night heralded in a difficult time with train travel to the Bronx and Manhattan, as a huge fire under the Metro North tracks serving the area disrupted service in the weeks following.
  • Early home runs by Carlos Beltran and Starlin Castro off one-time Yankee lefty David Huff, pitching for the Angels, opened enough of a cushion for Michael Pineda that Cole Calhoun‘s two-run blast in the fifth was easily overcome in a 6-3 home team win in the Stadium on June 7, 2016. Pineda, although he only struck out four, was dealing, and he threw 22 of 27 first-pitch strikes through seven innings before giving way to the pen.
  • Back-to-back, one-out, first-inning home runs by Mike Trout and Albert Pujols off CC Sabathia got the natives in Yankee Stadium restless on a gorgeous Sunday afternoon on June 7, 2015, but the big lefty regained his balance thereafter, and the Yanks cashed in a 6-2 win. Homers by Chris Young, Brett Gardner, and Jose Pirela, who also scored after a leadoff double for the Yanks’ first tally in the third, carried the home team to victory. The ceremonial first pitch was thrown out by jockey Victor Espinoza, fresh off his Triple Crown win riding American Pharoah to a win in the Belmont Stakes the day before.
  • It wasn’t a walkoff, and the eventual lead run would actually score on a less than borough-shaking Hideki Matsui groundout, but the 4-3 Yankee win over the Rays on June 7, 2009, in new Yankee Stadium was part and parcel of the new venue’s magic nonetheless. Johnny Damon and Mark Teixeira leadoff eighth-inning singles sparked the three-run, come-from-behind rally, Teixeira saved a bunch of runs with a series of great plays, Alfredo Aceves struck out four straight in gaining the win, and Mariano Rivera‘s 10-pitch, one-two-three, ninth-inning save was classic.
  • Backup catchers drove in second-inning runs for a 1-1 tie in a billed pitcher’s duel in Yankee Stadium on June 7, 2012, with Jose Lobaton driving in B.J. Upton and Chris Stewart answering with a an rbi groundout that plated Nick Swisher. But it went off script there, as back-to-back Tampa two-run rallies carried David Price and the Rays past CC Sabathia and the Yanks, 7-3. Russell Martin‘s leadoff ninth-inning home run was far too little, and well too late.
  • A traumatic and depressing three-game series hosting Boston in Yankee Stadium on June 7, 2012, got off to a bad start as Freddy Garcia was reached in the first inning for three runs on a Jacoby Ellsbury home run, a walk, an Adrian Gonzalez triple, and a sac fly, in an eventual 6-4 loss. Doing his best Josh Beckett impression, John Lester hit two Yankee batters in the first. The lone Yankee bright spot was Jorge Posada, who, once he replaced the struck Mark Teixeira at first, had three singles and a walk, scored one run, and drove in another.
  • Roger Clemens was masterful in a 4-0 Yankee victory over the Orioles in Yankee Stadium on June 7, 2001, allowing three hits while punching out 10 batters through eight innings. Catcher Todd Greene would up his rbi total to six over two games, though he would finish with just 11 after 33 more contests. The win was Joe Torre‘s 1,068th as pilot of the Pinstripers, moving him ahead of Miller Huggins.
  • In an interleague contest on June 7, 1998, the Yanks beat Florida 4-1 behind David Cone‘s brilliant two-hit pitching. He struck out 14 Marlins. Paul O’Neill poled a homer to right off Ryan Dempster in the first, and Tino Martinez and Bernie Williams went yard back-to-back in the third.
  • Chapter Two of the transfer of Joba Chamberlain from reliever to starter took place in a contest pitting the hard thrower against Zach Greinke and the Royals in Yankee Stadium on June 6, 2008. A Jose Guillen home run had Joba down 3-2 when he left in the fifth, but Bobby Abreu‘s third rbi in the bottom half tied the game. Dan Geise was the beneficiary of a Jason Giambi homer and an Alex Rodriguez two-run double that accounted for the 6-3 final, a Yankee win.
  • Former Yankee starter and recently Staten Island Yankees Manager Tommy John achieved his 200th win on this day in 1980, as he fashioned a two-hit, 1-0 masterpiece for a Yankee victory over the Mariners.
  • When Yogi Berra and Mickey Mantle homered in the third inning of a 5-1 Yankee win over the Twins on June 7, 1961, it extended the Bombers to a record-setting 31 dingers in their last 16 contests. Ralph Terry allowed the Twins a run in the first on two safeties, and then pitched hitless ball for eight.
  • After winning the first Yankee game in Wrigley Field the night before since the Bombers’ World Series sweep in 1938, New York battled the Cubbies in an interleague game on the nationally televised Game of the Week on June 7, 2003. Roger Clemens battled Kerry Wood, and the younger of the two fireballers prevailed in a 5-2 Cubs win. A seventh-inning, three-run home run off the bat of first baseman Eric Karros decided it. Karros only entered the game after starter Heep-Sok Choi seriously injured himself landing on his back while retiring Jason Giambi on an infield pop in the third.
  • Bob Sheppard made a rare vocal stumble in the first inning of a June 7, 2002 interleague battle between the Yankees and the Giants in Yankee Stadium, as he announced Jason Giambi as “Giambini.” But perhaps not, as Jason drove in Alfonso Soriano with the game’s first run, and just missed with a foul homer in a tight 2-1 Yankee victory. Mike Mussina outdueled Livan Hernandez, and Barry Bonds singled twice, walked and struck out.
  • Boston hurlers Greg Harris and Jeff Reardon collaborated on a one-hit, 3-0 win over the Yankees in Fenway on June 7, 1990.
  • On June 7, 1927, in Yankee Stadium, Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig cleared the fences back-to-back in the fourth inning, Pat Collins hit one out for the Yanks too, and Chicago’s Bud Clancy homered in a 4-1 Yankee win over the visiting White Sox.
  • The Yankees split a pair with the Angels on June 7, 1968, winning the first game 4-1 and falling in the second, 8-4.
  • Babe Ruth‘s 120th home run of his career, hit off Cleveland’s Jim Bagby on June 6, 1921, broke the post-1900 career mark formerly held by Gravvy Cravath. The Yanks beat the Indians 9-2 in New York.
  • The White Sox were the Yankees’ victims on June 7, 1939, as Joe DiMaggio, playing in his first game since April 29, tripled and led the Yanks to a 5-2 win.
  • The Yanks and Indians made history three years earlier on this day in 1936 when no players on either squad struck out in a 16-inning game. George Selkirk‘s homer was the difference in Red Ruffing‘s hard-fought 5-4 win over Cleveland’s Oral Hildebrand. Ruffing had three hits, including a home run.
  • The provisional signing turned out not to bear fruit, and the Yankees released veteran southpaw Jonathon Niese on June 7, 2017.
  • On June 7, 2016, the Yankees designated lefthander Tyler Olson for assignment, and optioned righty Luis Cessa to the AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders. Then the team selected the contract of righthander Anthony Swarzak from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, and signed free agent lefty Zak Wasserman to a minor league contract.
  • On June 7, 2012, the Yankees placed righty swingman Freddy Garcia on the bereavement leave list, and filled his spot by recalling reliever Ryota Igarashi from AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. In addition, New York signed free agent catcher Bolivar Perez.
  • On June 7, 2011, the Yankees signed minor league free agent second baseman Ronnier Mustelier.
  • On June 7, 2014, the Yankees sent righthander Shawn Kelley on a rehab assignment to the AA Trenton Thunder; and sent righty Alfredo Aceves outright to the AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders.
  • Before we enumerate a few amateur draft horror stories and coincidences, we’ll start with the mention of the Yankee first-round home run they hit when they took Thurman Munson as the fourth pick in the first round of the 1968 draft on June 7, his 21st birthday. On June 7, 1966, the Mets passed on Reggie Jackson in favor of catcher Steve Chilcott. One year later the Yankees used the first pick in the draft to take DH Ron Blomberg, who at least made history, if not the Hall for which we all had hoped. Ron walked to drive in a run in the first DH at bat in major league ball.
  • Small world. Three-year Yankee outfielder Gary Sheffield and his 2004-2005 teammate in the Bronx Kevin Brown were chosen sixth and fourth, respectively, in the first round of the amateur draft on June 7, 1986, Brown by the Rangers, and Shef by the Brewers.
  • And in the last of our group of draft selection mentions, Doc Gooden was the fifth choice overall when the Mets took him on this day in 1982.
  • The Yankees traded prospects Bobby Mitchell and Frank Tepedino to the Brewers for Danny Walton on this day in 1971.
  • The Bombers won 3-2 over the White Sox on June 7, 1913, but in a disastrous season, the victory only moved their record to an appalling 10-34.
  • When Milwaukee’s Cal Eldred beat the Mariners 5-3 on June 7, 1993, he became the fourth pitcher to win 20 during his 30 first appearances in the bigs, joining Boo Ferriss (in 1945), Russ Ford (in 1910), and Nick Maddox (in 1908). Ford did his work in a 26-6 year with the Highlanders, after posting no record in his only game in 1909.
  • The Yanks made it final and official when they released third baseman Morgan Ensberg on June 7, 2008.
  • After having reacquired him the year before, the Yanks sent first baseman Frank Tepedino (again), outfielder Wayne Nordhagen, and players to be named (Alan Closter and Dave Cheadle) to the Braves for pitcher Pat Dobson on June 7, 1973.
  • After trading their player-manager Jimmy Collins to the Athletics for infielder John Knight on June 7, 1907, the Red Sox bought Deacon McGuire from the Yanks to be their field boss.
  • Ex-Yankee Waite Hoyt was released by the Dodgers on June 7, 1932. Hoyt, who had won 157 while losing 98 for the 1921-1930 Yanks, would pitch through 1938, mostly with the Pirates. He went 15-6 in 1934.
  • The day that recent Yankee DH/first baseman Jason Giambi had in a 10-4 A’s victory over the Padres on June 7, 2000, is worthy of mention here, as he singled, doubled, and homered twice, driving in seven runs. Jason is back with the A’s in 2009.
  • The first recorded pinch hitter in baseball history took his swings on June 7, 1882, with John J. Doyle appearing for the Cleveland Spiders.
  • Dan Duryea was one of several stars of Pride of the Yankees, the tear-jerking tribute to and tragic story of the great Lou Gehrig. Dan passed away on June 7, 1968.
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    Players Who Have Died This Day

  • Yankee amateur draft pick and righthanded pitcher Tom Buskey (1998) is the only Bronx player to have died on June 7. Tom lost two and saved two in debuting with the 1973-1974 Yankees in 12 games (no starts). Sent to Cleveland with Fritz Peterson and two other pitchers in a swap that netted Chris Chambliss, among others, Buskey finished with an overall mark of 21-27-34 after pitching for the Indians and the Blue Jays from 1974 through 1980.
  • Among noteworthy nonYankee players to have died this day are lefthanded first baseman George Decker (1909), who hit 25 home runs with 415 rbi’s mostly for the Colts and the Colonels from 1892-1899; and shortstop Eddie Lake (1995), who reached 39 fences good for 193 runs driven in from 1939-1950, playing with the Cardinals, the Red Sox, and the Tigers. And righthander Ruben Quevedo (2016) pitched for the 2000 Cubs and the 2001 through 2003 Brewers to a 14-30 mark with no saves.
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    Players Born This Day

  • We’ll never know what numbers he would have added to his 10-year totals of 113 homers and 701 rbi’s had the late great Thurman Munson (1947) not been taken away from us at such a young age. This consummate Yankee Captain, the first since Lou Gehrig held the honor, is the first June 7 Yankee birthday we will acknowledge this day. Munson was a seven-time All Star in 10 years, he was a great clutch hitter, and has the 10th best World Series career batting average. But awards don’t do justice to the career of this great who died too young.
  • Three old-time Yankees share the seventh as birthday with Munson: Lefty Ed Wells (1900) posted a fine 37-20 win-loss record in 107 games for the Yankees from 1929 through 1932, and he was sold to the St. Louis Browns in December of that latter year.
  • Ralph Buxton (1914) pitched for the 1938 Philadelphia Athletics, and then made his next (and only other) big-league appearances with the 1949 Yankees, for whom he lost one game and saved two in 14 appearances.
  • Third baseman George Moriarty (1884) drove in 93 runs for the 1906-1908 Highlanders after two seasons with the Cubs; he played with the Tigers until 1915 once they purchased him from New York in January 1909.
  • One more birthday to mention is that of southpaw Joe Horgan (1977), whose only big-league experience has netted him a 4-1 record with the 2004 Montreal Expos and the 2005 Washington Nationals, who moved to the nation’s capital that year. The Yanks selected him in the latter rounds of the 1995 draft, but failed to sign him.
  • Other birthdays: lefthander Herb Score (1933), who won 55 while losing 46 with the Indians and the White Sox from 1955-1962; Roger Nelson (1944); George Mitterwald (1945), who hit 76 taters and 301 rbi’s for the Twins and the Cubs; Don Money (1947), who spent most of his 1968-1983 career in Milwaukee to the tune of 176 home runs and 729 rbi’s; Tim Laudner (1958); Trevor Wilson (1966); Heathcliff Slocumb (1966); Roberto Petagine (1971); Chris Richard (1974); Esix Snead (1976); Tyler Johnson (1981); Doug Mathis (1983); Mark Lowe (1983); Justin Berg (1984); Sean Halton (1987); Dean Kiekhefer (1989); Luke Farrell (1991); Vincent Velasquez (1992); and Ryder Jones (1994).