September 1 in Yankee History

  • The Yankees and the Tigers went to the ninth inning scoreless on September 1, 1961, in front of the biggest American League crowd of the year, with Whitey Ford opposing Don Mossi. The 65,000+ in Yankee Stadium thrilled to the Yankees’ 1-0 victory in this battle for first place, as two-out hits in the bottom of the ninth from Elston Howard, Yogi Berra, and Moose Skowron plated the game winner.
  • Back-to-back doubles by Brett Gardner and Aaron Judge off Doug Fister got the Yankee Stadium crowd hopping on September 1, 2017, but they would quiet down over the rest of the evening, as home runs by Eduardo Nunez, Andrew Benintendi, and Hanley Ramirez carried the Red Sox to a 4-1 victory. Sonny Gray allowed only four hits over seven innings, but three of them left the yard.
  • Maybe it was the manner in which the Yanks had taken their 3-0 lead after six against the Orioles in Yankee Stadium on September 1, 2013: an Alfonso Soriano third-inning single, and a bases-loaded walk and sac fly from Brett Gardner and Derek Jeter, respectively, in the fourth. It was too quiet. And then it all came crashing down on Andy Pettitte in the top of the seventh, with three singles, a home run, another single, and a walk, all with no outs. Shawn Kelley was greeted by an Adam Jones three-run bomb, and the O’s won this one 7-3, going away.
  • The Yankees squeaked by the Orioles in Yankee Stadium 4-3 on Saturday, September 1, 2012, on the quietest of late three-run rallies. A Raul Ibanez pinch single with one out in the seventh got it started, and one more single, three walks, and an error by shortstop Omar Quintanilla turned a 3-1 Birds lead into a Yankee win.
  • The Yanks managed to outscore the Oakland A’s 4-3 on September 1, 2010, as A.J. Burnett celebrated escaping August by pitching well and getting the win. Mark Teixeira had three hits and drove in three runs and the other scored on an error, Derek Jeter scored twice from the leadoff spot and, pinch-hitting in the eighth inning, Jorge Posada was tossed from the game for arguing a called third strike.
  • Playing center field, Yankee Tom Tresh slugged homers from each side of the plate in a 5-4 win over the Orioles on September 1, 1963. Mickey Mantle, allegedly worse for the wear from a night of partying, added a pinch homer in the eighth as he jumped on the first pitch from Moose McCormick.
  • Lou Gehrig was in the middle of perhaps the hottest streak of his career when he homered in both games of a doubleheader sweep over the Red Sox on September 1, 1931, 11-3 and 5-1. He had knocked in 21 runs in the last six games largely on the strength of grand slams, as the one he stroked in this day’s Game Two was the third he hit in four calendar days.
  • The bus trip I made with friends to Boston for a September 1, 1990, game was cursed from the start. The bus driver couldn’t find Fenway Park, and then was involved in a traffic accident. We abandoned ship and hoofed it to the Park in time to see Andy Hawkins fail to complete an inning. But the lowlight of the 15-1 loss was Mike Greenwell‘s ground-ball, inside-the-park grand slam home run off Greg Cadaret that eluded Jesse Barfield and rolled around Fenway’s curved right-field wall.
  • The Yankees and Minnesota Twins were hard-pressed to get their September 1, 2006, game finished in the Bronx with what was left of Hurricane Ernesto bearing down on New York. Cory Lidle bested Carlos Silva 8-1, largely on the strength of three Alex Rodriguez rbi’s, coming on two solo home runs to left and a one-base run-scorer up the middle.
  • On September 1, 2017, the Yankees transferred righty Luis Cessa from the 10-day disabled list to the 60-day disabled list, with a ribcage injury; and activated DH Matt Holliday from the 10-day disabled list. Then the team selected the contract of catcher Erik Kratz from the AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders; and recalled righthanders Bryan Mitchell and Ben Heller, and lefthander Jordan Montgomery, from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Finally, the club signed free agent shortstop Ronny Rojas to a minor league contract.
  • In a flurry of roster moves on September 1, 2015, the Yankees designated infielder Cole Figueroa and infielder/outfielder Tyler Austin for assignment; then recalled righthander Domingo German from the Tampa Yankees, and placed him on the 60-day disabled list, with April 2015 Tommy John surgery. Next the club selected the contracts of righthander Andrew Bailey, lefthander James Pazos, catcher Austin Romine, and center fielder Rico Noel from the AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders. Finally, the Yankees recalled second basemen Rob Refsnyder and Jose Pirela; and righthander Caleb Cotham from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
  • On September 1, 1972, Yankee rookie Charlie Spikes had two hits in his major-league debut, and made a great catch in right field, while Mel Stottlemyre topped the White Sox on four hits, 4-0.
  • It was September 1 expanded roster time in 2013, as the Yankees designated center fielder Melky Mesa for assignment; selected the contracts of lefty Cesar Cabral and catcher J.R. Murphy from the AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders; and recalled righthanded pitchers Brett Marshall and Dellin Betances, and third baseman David Adams, from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
  • As is typical of September 1, the Yanks made one subtraction and several additions to their major league roster on September 1, 2012. First, they designated shortstop Ramiro Pena for assignment; then selected the contract of left fielder Chris Dickerson from AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Finally, they recalled righthanders Adam Warren and Cory Wade; shortstop Eduardo Nunez; catcher Francisco Cervelli; and lefthander Justin Thomas from AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
  • The September 1, 2009, Yankee callups were righthanders Mark Melancon and Edwar Ramirez, infielder Ramiro Pena, catcher Francisco Cervelli, and lefthander Michael Dunn, all from AAA Scranton-Wilkes Barre.
  • Taking care of roster-expanding business, the Yankees transferred lefty reliever Damaso Marte from the 15-day to the 60-day disabled list on September 1, 2010, then activated first baseman Lance Berkman from the 15-day disabled list. The team also called up veteran catcher Chad Moeller from AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, and recalled Greg Golson and Jonathan Albaladejo from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre as well.
  • The Yankees reloaded with the opportunity to expand rosters on September 1, 2007, activating first baseman Doug Mientkiewicz and righty reliever Jose Veras from the 60-day disabled list. They also purchased the contract of righty starter Ian Kennedy from AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre and recalled infielder Alberto Gonzalez from AAA too.
  • The initial September callups the Yankees made on September 1, 2008 were not nearly as dramatic, perhaps because an under-armed team had largely been using AAA and AA pieces much of the year. They purchased the contracts of catcher Chad Moeller and lefthander Phil Coke from AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
  • The most casual of Yankee fans know that David Wells threw a Perfect Game in May 1998. How many, I wonder, remember that he almost duplicated the feat on September 1 of that year? Wells retired the first 20 A’s to face him until future Yankee Jason Giambi singled up the middle on an 0-2 pitch with two down in the seventh. Former Bomber Mike Blowers singled on a full count leading off the eighth, as Boomer shut out Oakland 7-0 while facing just 29 batters. Easing his way, David’s mates plated four in the first frame off Tom Candiotti, and Wells notched 13 strike outs in the win.
  • Young A’s outfielder Ben Grieve doubled and singled twice, driving in four teammates in a 7-1 victory over the Yankees on September 1, 1999. The only blemish against Omar Olivares was Chuck Knoblauch‘s sixth-inning home run as the A’s righty went the distance and held the home-standing Bombers to six hits.
  • The Yanks used the long ball to beat Brad Radke and the Twins 4-2 on September 1, 2000, with Orlando “el duque” Hernandez getting the win, despite allowing a home run to present Boston DH David Ortiz. All four Yankee runs crossed the plate via home runs from Paul O’Neill, Tino Martinez, and Bernie Williams.
  • When the Yanks got Sal “The Barber” Maglie from the Dodgers on September 1, 1957, it was too late for him to qualify to play in the World Series, but his two wins and three saves in six games down the stretch made the move worthwhile. Sal’s colorful nickname was attributable to his propensity for inside pitches, often giving batters a close “shave.”
  • Waite Hoyt was the 8-3 winner over Garland Braxton and the Senators despite the presence of soon-to-be President Hoover in the Washington stands pulling for the home team on September 1, 1928. Bob Meusel lashed four hits in as many chances and knocked in three runs.
  • The 1906 New York Highlanders (Yankees) swept their third doubleheader in as many days from the Senators on September 1, setting a new American League record. Their unprecedented “double” success would continue in the days ahead.
  • September 1 is a busy day in most major league camps, and on this day in 2011 the Yankees placed center fielder Justin Maxwell on the 60-day disabled list, as he recovered from October 2010 Tommy John surgery. The club called up righthander Scott Proctor and catcher Jesus Montero from AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre; recalled outfielder Chris Dickerson, righthander Lance Pendleton, and third baseman Brandon Laird from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre; and recalled lefthander Raul Valdes from AA Trenton.
  • Major League Baseball announced that they were ending the 1918 regular season due to World War I on September 1. And yes, if that date sounds familiar, it is indeed the year the Boston Red Sox won their last pre-2004 World Series, which would be starting in just a couple of days.
  • A’s rookie Jose Canseco became the first major league player to reach 100 rbi’s in the 1986 season when he went 4-for-5 and blasted his 28th home run in a 9-8 win over the Yankees on September 1.
  • Minnesota Twin Rod Carew stole home for a 10th-inning victory over Cleveland on September 1, 1972. Of Rod’s 17 career steals of home, seven of them were on his own (not part of a double steal). In a similar vein, pitcher Curt Simmons of the Cardinals stole home when a squeeze play was botched in a 7-3, September 1, victory over the Phillies in 1963. It was one of only two stolen bases Simmons managed in his career.
  • In another lowlight that will unfortunately be mentioned again in the coming days, the Yanks lost the first of three in Philly in their first visit to the Vet in Interleague play on September 1, 1997. We decided to “vacation” in Philly for the series, which started with Curt Schilling whiffing 16 and walking none in the 5-1 Yankee loss. Derek Jeter fell victim four times, and Tino Martinez and Paul O’Neill three times apiece.
  • Mets starter Tom Seaver reached the 200-strike out mark for a record eighth consecutive season during a 3-0 shutout of the Pirates on this day in 1975.
  • The Yankees had Roy Halladay and the Blue Jays on the ropes with a 3-0 sixth-inning lead on September 1, 2002, but the Jays bunched eight hits and seven runs off David Wells in the home sixth and seventh, and the Bombers couldn’t recover, falling 7-6.
  • The 182 home runs the Yankees amassed in 1936 stood as the major league record until the Giants surpassed that number on September 1, 1947 in an 8-1 win over the Dodgers. Among the gang of players clearing fences for that record-breaking Giants team (they would finish with 221) was Johnny Mize, who would be playing in the Bronx in two years.
  • On September 1, 2016, the Yankees signed free agent catcher Gabriel Mora to a minor league contract.
  • On September 1, 2014, the Yankees sent lefthander Rich Hill outright to the AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders.
  • The Yankees signed righthander and new draftee Graham Stoneburner on September 1, 2009.
  • None of three September 1 Yankee transactions had much of an effect, but they all pleased this fan. First on this day in 2001, the team re-acquired yet another ex-Yank as they got Randy Velarde from the Texas Rangers for two players to be named. And on September 1, 2005, the contract of Ramiro Mendoza was purchased from AAA Columbus. Fans were pleased that Mendoza was back with the team, but even happier with the transfer of Kevin Brown to the 60-day DL, a move that ensured that he had made his last appearance in the Bronx.
  • With the Orioles having his bat inspected, Alex Rodriguez borrowed a stick from Ken Griffey, Jr., and beat Baltimore 5-1 with a three-run bomb on this day in 1996, in the first of two September 1 highlights involving future Yankees playing with other teams. Alex’s home run came off future Yankee David Wells. And perhaps it was a day like this that convinced the Yanks to [mistakenly] sign Tony Womack to play in 2005. Womack homered twice and added a perfect bases-loading bunt single in a 7-6 Arizona win over San Fran on September 1, 2002.
  • Eventual 2008 AL Cy Young Award winner Cliff Lee won his 20th game of that season by blanking the White Sox 5-0. Other September 1, 20-game winners include Carl Hubbell of the Giants 2-0 over the Braves in 1933, and Ray Caldwell of the Indians in a 5-4 win over Detroit in 1920. On that same day, Grover Alexander of the Cubs won his 27th over St. Louis, with Jesse Haines suffering his 20th loss.
  • Major league baseball enjoyed a rare day on September 1, 2008, when both Adrian Beltre of Seattle and Stephen Drew of Arizona hit for the cycle.
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    Players Who Have Died This Day

  • Although he played just four games in ending his career with the 1904 Highlanders, catcher Frank McManus (1923) leads in longevity between the two Yankee players who have died on September 1. McManus, who had hit no home runs, but drove in two runs in previous work with Washington in 1899, Brooklyn in 1903, and Detroit earlier in that 1904 season, batted 0-for-7 and drove in no runs for New York. Outfielder Larry McClure‘s (1949) only big-league game was played with the 1910 Highlanders. He was hitless in one at bat, and knocked in no runs.
  • The late Commissioner of Baseball, A. Bartlett Giamatti, succumbed to a heart attack on September 1, 1989, eight days after banning Pete Rose for life. And September 1 is also the day that Frederick W. Thayer, inventor of the catcher’s mask, died in 1913. In addition, there are four noteworthy nonYankee players who have died this day. Shortstop Ivy Olson (1965) cleared most of his 13 fences good for 446 rbi’s between 1911 and 1924 with Cleveland and Brooklyn; third baseman Pinky Whitney (1987) hit 93 long balls and drove in 927 runs from 1928-1939, mostly with the Phillies, though he played three years with the Braves too; and outfielder Buster Adams (1990) hit 50 roundtrippers with 249 rbi’s in 1939 and from 1943-1947 with the Cardinals and the Phillies. Another third baseman on the list, Paul Schaal (2017) just about evenly split his 11 years from 1964 through 1974 between the Angels and the Royals. Paul hit 57 home runs and knocked in 323.
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    Players Born This Day

  • Foster Edwards (1903), who played for the Boston Braves from 1922 through 1928, until recently was the only Yankee born on September 1. He pitched in two games for the 1930 Yankees with no record, striking out one and walking two while allowing no hits.
  • But third baseman Kevin Orie (1972), who stroked 22 taters with 116 rbi’s for the Cubs and the Marlins between 1997 and 2002, was signed as a free agent with New York in June 2000. Without ever taking the field with the Yanks, he was granted his freedom that October. Also on the list of one-time Yanks born September 1 who never played for them is southpaw Lance Davis (1976), whose only big-leagues service was an 8-4 mark with Cincinnati in 2001. The Yanks plucked Davis from the roster of the independent Atlantic League Long Island Ducks in August 2004, but released him six weeks later.
  • Other birthdays lead off with jack of all baseball trades, so to speak, Hall of Famer Jim O’Rourke (1850), who spent most of his time from 1872-1904 with the Giants. He hit 62 home runs and drove in 1,203 runs. Others: Rico Carty (1939), who hit 204 homers with 890 rbi’s with the Braves (both Milwaukee and Atlanta) and the Indians primarily, from 1963-1979; Garry Maddox (1949); Rob Wilfong (1953); David West (1964); Luis Lopez (1964); Derek Wallace (1971); Jose Constanza (1983); Sean O’Sullivan (1987); David Carpenter (1987), not the same named reliever the Yanks had in 2015; and Trayvon Robinson (1987).