May 6 in Yankee History

  • In a game very uncharacteristic of their play in early 2016, the Yankees squeaked by visiting Boston 3-2 on May 6. Immediately down 2-0 on a David Ortiz first-inning home run, they tied it quickly on a Jacoby Ellsbury leadoff first-inning walk, followed by steals of second and third bases, and a Brian McCann rbi, then an Ellsbury rbi single in the second. Unfortunately, Ellsbury was injured trying to stretch the hit. Rick Porcello and Michael Pineda held it right there through six, and then the disappointing Aaron Hicks reached the Red Sox righty for a leadoff home run in the seventh. Ben Gamel made his major league debut replacing Dustin Ackley for defense in the eighth. Continue reading
  • May 2 in Yankee History

  • There is plenty of note that took place in the Yankee 5-1 win over Seattle on May 2, 2008, but I was shaken to see that the games-left counter in the Stadium was reduced from 69 to 68 by none other than the beloved Bobby Murcer, whose subsequent passing saddened the most stoic of Yankee fans to their emotional core. In the game, Chien-Ming Wang threw a beauty, allowing the run on just three hits and one walk through six. Melky Cabrera had a two-run double. Continue reading
  • May 1 in Yankee History

  • Blunting Yankee fan abuse for the second straight game, Robinson Cano knocked in the first two runs in a 4-2 Mariners win in the Stadium on April 1, 2014, twisting the knife in the wound on the second tally by beating out a potential double play grounder by busting it down to first base. Southpaw Roenis Elias bested Hiroki Kuroda in this one, and Jacoby Ellsbury‘s leadoff home run in the bottom of the first was blasted in vain. Continue reading
  • April 30 in Yankee History

  • Although I do sympathize with fans’ ire at long games, the Yanks have been having them with the Orioles for years, but particularly since the park at Camden Yards has been open. Taking advantage of a lull in my midweek work schedule in 1996, I traveled to Baltimore to see a two-game Yankees/Orioles set. The first became the longest nine-inning game in baseball history (to that point anyway), on April 30, 1996. The Orioles jumped all over poor Andy Pettitte for a 9-4 lead after two innings, but the Bombers fought back and tied it in the fifth, and won it 13-10, largely on the strength of a late Tino Martinez three-run home run. Jim Leyritz and Paul O’Neill homered too, and Paul’s was a mighty drive to right center that landed on a tile next to Boog’s Barbecue on Eutaw Street. The tile was marked to commemorate Paul’s homer’s landing point the next day (though no evidence remains except my eyewitness account, I believe). Continue reading
  • April 29 in Yankee History

  • Following a stunning offensive display the night before, the Yankees pounded the visiting Orioles 12-4 on April 29, 2017, although the number hangers and their roles in this one may surprise you. Supplying the firepower, Brett Gardner homered in both the first and second innings for his four rbi’s, and Austin Romine knocked in five with a sac fly and a single and home run, each for two runs. And although Aaron Judge of course homered as well, he scored four times with two walks and a single. Continue reading
  • April 28 in Yankee History

  • The Yankees posted an unlikely extra-inning, come-from-behind victory over the visiting Orioles on April 28, 2017, one in which Baltimore held 5-0, 9-1, and 11-4 leads in regulation. One uplifting way to look at this is that uber-rookie Aaron Judge refused to lose, as it was his home runs in both the fifth and sixth innings that began the stirring comeback. Then Jacoby Ellsbury, incongruously penciled in to the cleanup spot, delivered his first career grand slam home run in the seventh, and Starlin Castro tied it with a three-run jolt with one down in the ninth. Displaying mercy to the beleaguered Orioles and to the worn-out crowd, the Yanks finished it quickly, with Matt Holliday following two walks and a strike out in the bottom of the 10th with a three-run bomb of his own, 14-11 Yankees! Continue reading
  • April 27 in Yankee History

  • April 27, 1947, was Babe Ruth Day in all major league parks. It’s ironic, and anticlimactic, that the Yanks were shut out, 1-0, on the day all of baseball honored the greatest power hitter there ever was. The Babe’s words to the 58,339 in attendance at Yankee Stadium were broadcast throughout the country and into every major league park. Let’s face it. The man is the greatest icon in modern American sport, and always will be. Continue reading